Directory Profiles

Dr. Howard Harshaw

Biography

As a human dimensions of natural resources researcher, Howie‘s work is framed as applied social science. He seeks to integrate social science into the planning and management of outdoor recreation and natural resources, and has worked regularly in interdisciplinary teams to provide theoretically-based empirical research contributions to broader landscape-based projects examining sustainability issues. He believes that outdoor recreation plays a key role in connecting people to the natural environment; understanding people’s relationships with nature is critical for addressing growing public concerns with, and expectations of, natural resource management. Throughout his research, Howie has worked with communities, municipal and provincial governments, and industry to better represent the views and attitudes of recreationists and the public in policy and operational decisions. Howie is particularly interested in exploring the role of social networks, recreation specialization, and peoples environmental values on people’s attitudes about climate change and natural resource management.

Featured Research Summaries

Easing the Forestry Footprint on Vancouver Island’s Tourism Industry

Selected Publications

Reducing the impact of forest harvesting on the Vancouver Island tourism industry
Hilsendager KW, HW Harshaw & RA Kozak
The Forestry Chronicle 92:101–111 (Mar 2016)

Community forestry in British Columbia: Policy progression and public participation
Furness E, HW Harshaw & H Nelson
Forest Policy and Economics 58:85–91 (Sep 2015)

Using the recreation opportunity spectrum to evaluate the temporal impacts of timber harvesting on outdoor recreation settings
Harshaw HW & SRJ Sheppard
Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism 1–2:40–50 (Jun 2013)

Public Preference for Endemism over Other Conservation-Related Species Attributes
Meuser E, HW Harshaw & AØ Mooers
Conservation Biology 23:1041–1046 (Aug 2009)

Social Structure, Identities, and Values: A Network Approach to Understanding People’s Relationships to Forests
Harshaw HW & DB Tindall
Journal of Leisure Research 37:426–449 (2005)